Xeriscape: Annuals and Perennials

Many flowers enliven xeriscape landscapes. They can be mixed with shrub borders, planted as edgings, or used with mulches as alternatives to turf areas. Perennials and annuals that meet the low-water requirements of xeriscaping are available at most nurseries and Garden centers. Before planting flowers, improve the soil to foster root growth. Locate the Garden…

Xeriscape: Mulches

In the high plains grasslands, dead grass and plants accumulate. These plant remains are natural mulches and are a great benefit for growing plants. They keep the soil moist and loose, permit air and water to pass freely to plant roots, and reduce soil erosion and weeds. Following Mother Nature’s example will provide those same…

Xeriscape: Ornamental Grasses

asses are one of the dominant plants native to the Colorado plains. Native and adapted grasses have recently become a valued addition to Gardens. Ornamental grasses add two important elements to Gardens that no other group of plants can. With the slightest breeze, a Garden with grasses comes alive with movement and sound. Grasses are…

Xeriscape: Maintenance

The easiest way to minimize landscape maintenance is to plant Gardens adapted to the local environment. In Colorado, low precipitation -only about 15 inches per year along the Front Range — means Colorado Gardeners must develop an awareness of wise water use, and incorporate plants that use water efficiently. Xeriscapes, or water-efficient Gardens, are earth…

Xeriscape: Turf and Alternatives

Is Colorado a desert? Not quite, but almost. Moist areas along the Front Range receive about 15 inches of precipitation a year. And Kentucky bluegrass, the type of lawn most commonly grown here, grows best on 30 or more inches of moisture a year. That means you’ll need to apply an additional 15 inches of…

Learning More About Xeriscape

Whether installing a new landscape or retrofitting an existing landscape, some water-saving options are available.   Xeriscape is a water conscious, creative landscape. Xeriscape started in Colorado as part of a regionally-adapted Gardening style and there are many local xeriscape information resources. Brochures and fact sheets are available from botanic Gardens and water utilities, and…

Xeriscape Soil Amendments

Soil isn’t just something that gets on your shoes, it’s the foundation of any good Garden and landscape. Top soil, the rich, upper layer of earth, is usually lost during home construction. The soil left is mostly heavy clay, very light sand, or, in the foothills and mountains, shallow and rocky. Clay soils hold water…

Xeriscape Design

Color, fragrance and variety are components of successful landscape planning and design. When designs also focus on xeriscape, the need for water and other resources will be minimized. The xeriscape planning and design process should organize landscape ideas. The process should also identify the needs of the landscape and the plants the designer wants to…

Xeriscape Basics

Colorado’s Front Range receives an average of less than 15 inches of rain a year, making supplemental watering a necessity for most landscapes. More than half of the water used in homes is applied to landscapes. That’s why landscaping for water conservation is so important. By applying the principles of xeriscape, a landscape can be…